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20 Best NPS Survey Questions and Templates (2021 Guide)

Pragadeesh

7 min read

Are you curious about what NPS survey questions you can ask your customers?

Need some ideas or templates to write your own NPS questions?

An NPS survey is one of the best ways to measure your customers’ loyalty and satisfaction.

In this article, we’ve put together a massive list of NPS survey question examples.

Before we dive into this list, it’s essential to know how NPS surveys work.

What is an NPS Survey and How Does It Work?

An NPS survey typically consists of two questions: a rating question and an open-ended, follow-up question.

The rating question is the standard NPS question that you’ve probably already seen and answered before. It asks you to give an NPS score — a score of 0-10 that measures the willingness of customers to recommend a product or service to their friends or colleagues.

NPS rating question example

Based on the score (0-10), the customers fall into one of the three categories:

  • Promoters (9 or 10)
  • Passives (7-8)
  • Detractors (0-6)

Now depending on their score and the category they fall under, you ask them a follow-up question. It is a free response, open-ended question that allows customers to provide the reason(s) for their chosen score in their own words.

In other words, the follow-up question helps you figure out what made them choose that score.

For instance, if I gave a score of 5, one example of a follow-up question would be:

NPS follow up question example

While the NPS score questions help you calculate your NPS score and measure customer satisfaction, the follow-up questions are incredibly important in that they help you gain insight into why a customer scored the way they did.

20 NPS Survey Questions and Examples

Below, you’ll find a list of example NPS questions. You can use these sample questions as a template to run your own NPS surveys.

Examples of NPS Rating Questions

The standard NPS question is “How likely are you to recommend us to your friends and family?”, but depending on your scenario and what you want your users or customers to rate, you can modify the main question.

Here are some variations of the main question you can use for different scenarios:

Asking Customers to Rate Your Business

Instead of a nonspecific us, you can simply replace us in the standard question with your business name.

“On a scale of 0-10, how likely are you to recommend [your business name] to a friend or a colleague?”

This question helps you measure your customers’ overall satisfaction with your business and how they feel about your business in general.

You can also rephrase the above question in a way that directly asks about their experience with your business:

“Considering your experience with [your business name,] how likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague?”

This re-wording of the main question helps you better evaluate your customers’ general experience with your company.

Asking Customers to Rate Your Product

If you’re looking to measure your customers’ experience towards a particular product or service, you can replace your business name with your product or service name.

“How likely are you to recommend [your product name] to a friend or colleague?”

Again, the above generic question can be phrased in a way that directly asks about their experience with your product within a certain timeframe:

“Based on your experience of using [your product name] for [length of time], how likely are you to recommend it to a friend or colleague?”

You can also get a little more specific and ask your users to rate a particular feature or piece of experience within your product or service:

“How likely are you to recommend this feature to a friend or a colleague?”

Asking Customers to Rate Your Customer Service

When you want to measure a customer’s likelihood to recommend your customer service or customer support, replace “business name” with “support staff” or “customer support service”.

For instance:

“How likely are you to recommend our customer support service to a friend or colleague?”

“How likely are you to recommend our support staff to a friend or colleague?”

Asking Customers to Rate their Recent Interaction or Transaction

A transactional NPS (tNPS) survey asks customers to rate a recent interaction regarding a specific customer touchpoint — post-service, post-purchase, or post-onboarding interactions.

It helps you discover any issues with a specific customer experience and improve it.

One way to ask these questions is to simply add “based on your most recent interaction” to the beginning or end of your survey question.

For instance:

“How likely are you to recommend us to your friends and family, based on your most recent interaction?”

“Based on your recent interaction(s) with our support staff, how likely are you to recommend them?”

“Based on your recent purchase, how likely are you to recommend us to your friends & family?”

“Now that you’ve received [your product name], how likely are you to recommend [your company name] to a friend or colleague?”

Asking Customers to Rate Your Company as a Workplace

NPS surveys can also be used to assess your employees’ loyalty to your company.

Measuring employee loyalty is important as it:

  • helps you predict how long an employee will stay at your company.
  • helps you find out if a negative employee experience is leading to a negative customer experience.
  • prevent an employee from leaving your company by resolving his or her issues
  • prevent unhappy employees from talking ill about your company

To create an employee NPS (eNPS) survey, add “company name as a workplace” or “company name as a place of work” to your NPS question.

For instance:

“How likely are you to recommend (your company name) as a workplace to your friends?”

“How likely are you to recommend (your company name) as a place of work to your friends?”

Examples of NPS Follow Up Questions

Based on your customers’ answers to your rating question, you can ask them the following open-ended questions to get valuable feedback.

What is the Primary Reason for Your Score?

This is the standard follow-up question that helps reveal the main reason behind the chosen score. While the question might be a little generic, it helps you get a direct answer from your customers without overwhelming them.

What Do You Like the Most About Our (Product or Company Name)?

When you know the aspects of your business or product that your customers love, you can find new ways to enhance your product. You can build new features or optimize existing ones around customers’ interests. The question helps you do more of what works best for your customers.

What Do You Like the Least About Our (Product or Company Name)?

This question helps you find all the least favorite aspects of your product or business. With this question, you can easily spot all the things that don’t seem to be working well for your customers and fix them. Knowing what your customers dislike can help you improve or eliminate things to serve them better.

Why Would You (Not) Recommend Us?

This question is quite straightforward and allows your customers to give specific reasons as to why they would or would not recommend your business to their friends or colleagues. Also, because of the way it’s worded, it lets your customers open up about their frustrations with your product or service.

What Was Missing or Disappointing in Your Experience With Us?

Ask this question to understand the elements of your product that seem missing or disappointing to your customers. You can then use their answer to prioritize the problems they face and ensure an improved experience.

Which Features Do You Value (or Use) the Most?

A product typically consists of multiple features. You can ask this question to understand the features that matter the most to a specific customer. Product managers find this question useful as it helps them prioritize their product roadmap and understand what’s valuable to the end customer.

How Do You Benefit from Using Our (Product or Service Name)?

This question helps you understand the benefits your customers derive from using your product. When you know the top benefits your product provides to your customers, you can use these insights to better market your product or service.

How Does Our Product Meet Your Needs?

Use this question to understand how well your product solves your customers’ unique needs. It also helps you understand whether the solution you’ve built really solves their problems.

What Should We Improve?

This is another useful question that helps improve your product or service. This question can help you uncover the areas or aspects of your product or business that your customers have issues with.

What Problem Are You Trying to Solve with Our Product?

You can ask this question to understand the main job —or the primary problem— they hired your product to solve. Also, you can find your customers’ unique needs for which they use your product.

Why Did You Opt for Us Over Our Competition?

Ask this question to understand the unique values your product provides that motivated the customers to choose you over your competition. You’ll gain clarity on all the values only your product can deliver to your customers.

What is the One Thing We Could Do to Make You Happier with Our Product?

This question helps you uncover the one thing that, when improved, leads to a better, more happier experience for your customers. Also, this question helps you show your customers that you care for them and are genuinely interested in improving their experience.

Would You like to Schedule a Call with Our Customer Success Team?

You ask this question to customers who fall into the detractors (0-6) category. Depending on the product and the market you serve, you can help your customers get in touch with your customer success team so they could resolve your customers’ issues.

Would You Like to Share Your Positive Experience?

Ask this question to your promoters to get a testimonial and possibly unearth the reasons that lead to this experience.

Final Thoughts

And there you have it! You now have all the sample NPS survey questions you need to craft your own.

Looking for even more NPS survey questions? Check out our article on how to get customer testimonials and case studies using NPS surveys.

And here’s another article that gives you some tips on how you can improve your NPS survey response rates.

Did we miss out on any excellent NPS survey questions? Let us know in the comments section below.

Looking to create conversational NPS surveys that your customers will love answering? Check out our readymade NPS survey templates.

Pragadeesh

I'm a developer turned marketer, working as a Product Marketer at SurveySparrow — A survey tool that lets anyone create beautiful, conversational surveys people love to answer.

pragadeesh

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